Fireworks Update

The Menard’s, at the east end of Clark Lake, are preparing for their big fireworks display, planned for this evening (Sat, July 8).  The family moved the annual event to this evening so family members who put on the show could all be present.  And present, they are.  Evelyn Menard comments “we have a big group here today, and this year we’re not settling for hot dogs and hamburgers…we’re roasting a pig!” To read about the Menard’s display other years, please click here.  Evelyn adds “pray that the wind goes down.”  The NOAA forecast from Jackson’s Reynolds Field has the wind from the north at 6 mph this evening.  This photo was taken the night of July 3rd at Clark Lake by Diane Deming.

Today’s wind created a cool morning, and a crisp, fresh feel to Clark Lake.  As the day progressed, the wind brought sailors onto the lake, and did not dampened the outlook for power boats and rafts.

Last Night’s Storm

Last night’s storm that took out power for about 130,000 Consumers Energy customers mostly skipped Clark Lake.  The National Weather Service posted a Severe Thunderstorm Warning about 30 minutes before it hit Clark Lake.  The storm was traveling from northwest to southeast.  Even though Clark Lake was in the direct path, it passed on either side of the lake. 

There was, however, some lightning, a few hailstones, and wind, but not the 60 mph predicted.  If floaties or other toys were left on docks, they might have been lifted away.  And rain?  There was some, but not enough to leave evidence of it in this Clark Lake birdbath this morning.

 

For Sunset Connoisseurs

Tonight’s sunset stood up to expectations for Clark Lake sunset connoisseurs.  As often is the case, when the sun is still well above the horizon, there is no surety as to what’s ahead.  But there was no question, that the July 4th sunset was a strong complement to Independence Day 2017.

Here are some photos of tonight’s progression.

Not far from the location where the above photos were taken, Bill Leutz illustrates the range of contrasts in the sky.

Boat Count 2017

By today’s official Clark Lake boat count, the total number of boats on the lake beat all records.  Last year’s total showed 1,590, and this year’s total is 1,653. 

Here are some key takeaways.

  • Rafts have a commanding lead, and they are up 4%, from 583 to 607.
  • Inboards have increased 8% and now number 86.  This is significant in that these are high ticket items, as are some of the newer rafts.
  • People-power watercraft are up 4% from last year.
  • While kayaks beat all other people-power craft, they are down 5%.  Paddle boards increased 25% and paddle boats, 28%.  Paddle boards didn’t show in the boat count until 2014, and there are now 91 of them at the lake.
  • The number of boats per cottage has increased to 3.6 from 3.5.  Since 1987, the low year was 1999.
  • The percentage of of boats moored at the clubs is about the same.  

The Clark Lake boat count traditionally occurs on July 4th, with the assumption that any boat that is going in the water, will be in the lake by this date.  Bill Tuttle leads the crew–Steve Wawro, Lance Hollner, Jim Tuttle, and Rick Belcher.  At sunrise, the crew departed from Kentucky Point and followed the shoreline around the lake. 

Bill Tuttle, Lance Hollner, Jim Tuttle, Steve Wawro

The boat count was initiated by Bowser Eagy in 1959.  Data from 1961 thru 1986 is missing.

Live Music on the Lake

That gentle sax and melodious voice emanating from the Eagle Point cove this evening did not come from a CD or iPhone blue-toothed to a speaker.  It was none other than a person who has performed frequently and garnered high praise at the Eagle Pointe Bar & Grill.  Instead of his typical surroundings, Benny Poole stepped onto a raft with a small speaker to accompany his repertoire of standards. Benny, who is 88, adapted quickly.

David Nichols made it happen.  He wanted to add a special kick to the Independence Day weekend.  The Nichols-Bentley family, relations, friends and neighbors were the beneficiaries all along the cove. 

The skies darkened, and radar showed a storm was moving toward Clark Lake.  But as long as Benny played, all was well.

Your reporter chose a precarious perch to bring this story to you, but managed not to fall into the lake…

Fireworks Update

Fireworks at Clark Lake will occur over at least three evenings.  Although the lake has no “official” date for fireworks, here is a summary of plans.  

Monday, July 3 – Luminaries provided and distributed by the Raft-O-Rama Committee. Click to read Illuminating Clark Lake’s Shorelines

Tuesday, July 4 – Beach and Boat Club (at the location of the former Consumers Power Clubhouse)

Saturday, July 8 – Menard’s at the east end of the lake.  Click to learn more about how the Menard’s help the lake celebrate Independence Day.

 

Painting Party at the Yacht Club

When you think of painting at the lake, it usually means slapping another coat on the deck, dock or side of the cottage.  Tonight, the Clark Lake Yacht Club provided a different interpretation.  Assembled were people who were looking to free the captive artist within. 

Kim Swartz led the group in their quest.  When asked how do you teach people how to paint, her answer was surprising.  “They already know,” she said.

Amy Locke, who is a Yacht Club member, explains why the Club put on the event.

The original plan called for the event to take place at the shoreline, but rain changed the venue.  Fortunately, the Yacht Club great room is a place conducive to events, whether it be to gather after a regatta or to learn about how to be creative with a paint brush.

 

 

More on the Township Park

As reported previously, on Monday, June 19, the Township Park on Hyde Road took the stage during the Township Trustee’s meeting last week.  To review that story, please click here

In this update, get additional perspectives from Treasurer John Calhoun and Police Chief David Elwell who gave their views during the meeting, but also made comments for this website after the meeting.   

Township Treasurer John Calhoun lives at Clark Lake, and is in the proximity of the Park.  He was a voice for creating a commission of residents to deal with the park, and also believes that the park cannot be limited to township residents only.

Police Chief David Elwell told trustees that his department had written 34 tickets from June 1 up to the date of the meeting on June 19th.  In this video he spotlighted alcohol and parking enforcement.

Judi Kelly’s house faces the Township Park.  And because she owns Doyle’s Market she is in a good position to view activity in the park.  She spoke during public comment at the beginning of the meeting, and her message to the trustees is presented here again.

Like Judi’s views, these comments from Trustee Flip Reynolds made after the meeting have been discussed around the lake this week.  Flip’s views are repeated here.

Trustees in May voted to authorize the personnel committee to work with legal counsel and police chief to draft a new ordinance.  The personnel committee consists of the township supervisor, clerk, and controller.  Supervisor Bob Elrod said the plan is to “put some teeth in the ordinance.” 

Police Chief David Elwell commented “the ordinance should be revised and modernized.”  He believes most prohibitions should remain in place, but the language of the ordinance should comply with current court requirements.  Ordinance 18 was last voted upon in 1981, and some of that may have been carried forward from earlier versions.  The chief notes “the ultimate goal is to revise the ordinance to reflect the Trustees’ intent and to create a family-friendly atmosphere in the park so that issues that come up in the summer are prevented.”

The group working on revisions may look at regulations and formats in place for Blackman Township and County parks but adapt them for local needs.

As it stands, Township Ordinance 18 governs park activity.  If you peruse it below, you will see that it covers a lot of ground, but apparently falls short of getting the job done in its current form.

As reported previously on this website, trustees in May voted to authorize the personnel committee to work with legal counsel and police chief to draft a new ordinance.  The personnel committee consists of the township supervisor, clerk, and controller.  Supervisor Bob Elrod said the plan is to “put some teeth in the ordinance.” 

Police Chief David Elwell commented “the ordinance should be revised and modernized.”  He believes most prohibitions should remain in place, but the language of the ordinance should comply with current court requirements.  Ordinance 18 was last voted upon in 1981, and some of that may have been carried forward from earlier versions.  The chief notes “the ultimate goal is to revise the ordinance to reflect the Trustees’ intent and to create a family-friendly atmosphere in the park so that issues that come up in the summer are prevented.”

The group working on revisions may look at regulations and formats in place for Blackman Township and County parks but adapt them for local needs.

As it stands, Township Ordinance 18 governs park activity.  If you peruse it below, you will see that it covers a lot of ground, but apparently falls short of getting the job done in its current form.

As reported previously on this website, trustees in May voted to authorize the personnel committee to work with legal counsel and police chief to draft a new ordinance.  The personnel committee consists of the township supervisor, clerk, and controller.  Supervisor Bob Elrod said the plan is to “put some teeth in the ordinance.” 

Police Chief David Elwell commented “the ordinance should be revised and modernized.”  He believes most prohibitions should remain in place, but the language of the ordinance should comply with current court requirements.  Ordinance 18 was last voted upon in 1981, and some of that may have been carried forward from earlier versions.  The chief notes “the ultimate goal is to revise the ordinance to reflect the Trustees’ intent and to create a family-friendly atmosphere in the park so that issues that come up in the summer are prevented.”

The group working on revisions may look at regulations and formats in place for Blackman Township and County parks but adapt them for local needs.

As it stands, Township Ordinance 18 governs park activity.  If you peruse it below, you will see that it covers a lot of ground, but apparently falls short of getting the job done in its current form.

As reported previously on this website, trustees in May voted to authorize the personnel committee to work with legal counsel and police chief to draft a new ordinance.  The personnel committee consists of the township supervisor, clerk, and controller.  Supervisor Bob Elrod said the plan is to “put some teeth in the ordinance.” 

Police Chief David Elwell commented “the ordinance should be revised and modernized.”  He believes most prohibitions should remain in place, but the language of the ordinance should comply with current court requirements.  Ordinance 18 was last voted upon in 1981, and some of that may have been carried forward from earlier versions.  The chief notes “the ultimate goal is to revise the ordinance to reflect the Trustees’ intent and to create a family-friendly atmosphere in the park so that issues that come up in the summer are prevented.”

The group working on revisions may look at regulations and formats in place for Blackman Township and County parks but adapt them for local needs.

As it stands, Township Ordinance 18 governs park activity.  If you peruse it below, you will see that it covers a lot of ground, but apparently falls short of getting the job done in its current form.

As reported previously on this website, trustees in May voted to authorize the personnel committee to work with legal counsel and police chief to draft a new ordinance.  The personnel committee consists of the township supervisor, clerk, and controller.  Supervisor Bob Elrod said the plan is to “put some teeth in the ordinance.” 

Police Chief David Elwell commented “the ordinance should be revised and modernized.”  He believes most prohibitions should remain in place, but the language of the ordinance should comply with current court requirements.  Ordinance 18 was last voted upon in 1981, and some of that may have been carried forward from earlier versions.  The chief notes “the ultimate goal is to revise the ordinance to reflect the Trustees’ intent and to create a family-friendly atmosphere in the park so that issues that come up in the summer are prevented.”

The group working on revisions may look at regulations and formats in place for Blackman Township and County parks but adapt them for local needs.

As it stands, Township Ordinance 18 governs park activity.  If you peruse it below, you will see that it covers a lot of ground, but apparently falls short of getting the job done in its current form.

As reported previously on this website, trustees in May voted to authorize the personnel committee to work with legal counsel and police chief to draft a new ordinance.  The personnel committee consists of the township supervisor, clerk, and controller.  Supervisor Bob Elrod said the plan is to “put some teeth in the ordinance.” 

Police Chief David Elwell commented “the ordinance should be revised and modernized.”  He believes most prohibitions should remain in place, but the language of the ordinance should comply with current court requirements.  Ordinance 18 was last voted upon in 1981, and some of that may have been carried forward from earlier versions.  The chief notes “the ultimate goal is to revise the ordinance to reflect the Trustees’ intent and to create a family-friendly atmosphere in the park so that issues that come up in the summer are prevented.”

The group working on revisions may look at regulations and formats in place for Blackman Township and County parks but adapt them for local needs.

As it stands, Township Ordinance 18 governs park activity.  If you peruse it below, you will see that it covers a lot of ground, but apparently falls short of getting the job done in its current form.

As reported previously on this website, trustees in May voted to authorize the personnel committee to work with legal counsel and police chief to draft a new ordinance.  The personnel committee consists of the township supervisor, clerk, and controller.  Supervisor Bob Elrod said the plan is to “put some teeth in the ordinance.” 

Police Chief David Elwell commented “the ordinance should be revised and modernized.”  He believes most prohibitions should remain in place, but the language of the ordinance should comply with current court requirements.  Ordinance 18 was last voted upon in 1981, and some of that may have been carried forward from earlier versions.  The chief notes “the ultimate goal is to revise the ordinance to reflect the Trustees’ intent and to create a family-friendly atmosphere in the park so that issues that come up in the summer are prevented.”

The group working on revisions may look at regulations and formats in place for Blackman Township and County parks but adapt them for local needs.

As it stands, Township Ordinance 18 governs park activity.  If you peruse it below, you will see that it covers a lot of ground, but apparently falls short of getting the job done in its current form.

Super Sunset Surprise

Tonight’s weather conditions suggested that the sunset would be enjoyable, but not necessarily extraordinary.  Surprises happen all the time, and this was one of them.

Here’s a slightly different view at about the same time.

Bill Leutz, not far away from the scene above, adds to tonight’s collection, below.

If you face west at Clark Lake, you get to see sunsets.  If you face east, sunrises.  Tonight, facing east shared the bounty of tonight’s sunset, too.   Ann Swain captured these three views during the sunsets phases, starting with the earliest.

Were You at Clark Lake for Tonight’s Sunset?

For those who had to leave, here’s a time lapse of tonight’s sunset–notice it’s the sun and clouds that move, not the trees and other landmarks in this time lapse.  And as usual, Clark Lake did not disappoint.

Below, a closer view.

Clark Lake ushered in the first day of summer with a sunset worth remembering.  Here are two photos from June 21st, not previously published on this website.