Gone!

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The boat lift that froze in place near the township park appears to be in about the same location when ice overtook it

Clark Lake awoke this morning to open water, with only a few chunks of ice bobbing around the shoreline like ice cubes in a glass of lemonade on a summer afternoon.  The refreshing change brought out people who were taking in the lake’s advance into the spring season.

Another thought about the thaw comes from John Deming. He points out that after “extended winter conditions the possibility of a fish die-off increases.”  If you see evidence of this, would you please email this website at clarklakespirit@gmail.com?  Also a reminder to watch for glass bottles and other trash that was left on the ice and could be floating your way.

 

He Couldn’t Wait!

Mike Ligibel in the Sandy Beach area of Clark Lake

Mike Ligibel in the Sandy Beach area of Clark Lake

Mike Ligibel is pushing the envelope for spring to arrive. Nancy, his wife, took this photo on Saturday as Mike, using waders, explored the ice in front of his house in the Sandy Beach Road area.  He found the ice to be very slushy.  He said “it might hold you in some locations, but I sure wouldn’t trust it.”

The ice floe had moved towards Eagle Point by Monday (this) morning.  But by afternoon, it was back in the Sandy Beach area.

Meanwhile, regarding the way the ice is going out this season, John Calhoun comments “Gotta love that west wind!  I won’t be rebuilding the rock sea wall like last year!”

A  boat lift near the township park that was frozen in place and spent the winter in the lake, remains in the same place.  The ice could have carried it away, but did not.

Two intrepid Clark Lakers, Ann Clark and Katie Rensch (both have houses in the Eagle Point cove on the east end), appear to be first at getting their docks in the water this season.  Every year, it seems harder to be first in, especially if the lake is still frozen in front of your place!

Going…going…gone?

View of the east end of Clark Lake from Eagle Point

View of the east end of Clark Lake from Eagle Point

View of Clark Lake from the Eagle Point Marine, looking northwest

View of Clark Lake from the Eagle Point Marine, looking northwest

View of Clark Lake from the boat ramp at the Head of the Lake

View of Clark Lake from the boat ramp at the Head of the Lake

Not quite!  Today (Saturday) the areas of open water widened greatly. Check out these photos taken this afternoon. But note the picture taken from the Eagle Point shoreline in the direction of Kentucky Point.  So the “gone” part of the headline is yet to be seen.

This is one of the "not yet" sections of the lake.  View is from the Eagle Point shoreline looking towards Kentucky Point

This is one of the “not gone” sections of the lake. View is from the Eagle Point shoreline looking towards Kentucky Point

It’s Beginning to Happen

View of Clark Lake from the Eagle Point shoreline on the west side of the lake, looking northwest.

View of Clark Lake from the Eagle Point shoreline on the west side of the lake, looking northwest.

And today (Friday) provided strong evidence that this winter’s ice on Clark Lake is on the way out.  With sunshine and warmer temperatures over the last few days, several large areas of open water have appeared.  This afternoon’s high wind gave the ice a push and created ice floes.  In past seasons, these ice floes have sometimes piled up along some shorelines and threatened breakwaters.  There is a photo on this website of ice clogging the dam at Ocean Beach.  So far no problems like these have been observed this season.

Familiar wildlife continue to visit us.  These include ducks, wood ducks, sandhill cranes, Canadian geese and robins.

Clark Lake Author Writes Again

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Author Laurice LaZebnik with two best friends–Herbie and Zelda–in front of the Kentucky Point home that she shares with her husband, Bob.

Clark Lake author Laurice LaZebnik’s latest book has just been published, and the main character in the storyline has roots from this area.  The Atomic Sailor is based on the fascinating real life stories of Admiral James H. McLaughlin, who lived in Brooklyn for part of his life.  Laurice interviewed him extensively, most often over breakfast at the Brooklyn Big Boy.  What came out of these discussions is an engaging story in a book that you won’t want to put down.   Details to follow on this website.

Laurice LaZebnik has also written Strongheart, A Dog Who Was a Coward.  It is available for sale at Doyle’s on Hyde Road.

Every Minute of Sun…

This view of the dam looking northwest shows where the water ends and the ice begins, Tuesday, April 2

This view of the dam looking northwest shows where the water ends and the ice begins, Tuesday, April 1

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Although hard to see in this photo taken from Kentucky Point, there is a wide area of open water surrounding Eagle Point. Wednesday, April 2.

…is changing the look of Clark Lake.  Today (Wednesday) more open water appeared between Kentucky and Eagle Point as well as some other places around the lake.  There is at least 10 feet of open water along most shorelines and that distance appears to be widening with every hour of sunshine.  The only activity on the ice has been visits by Sandhill cranes, geese and a few ducks.

Observing the DamCam through its wide-angle lens gives the observer the idea that there is open water to the middle of the lake.  The open water at the east end near the dam actually extends out into the lake a few feet beyond the length of the Ocean Beach Pier.

The color of the ice today (Wednesday, April 2) appeared to be turning from gray to a color something like a muted turquoise.  If past years are an indicator, this could mean that the ice on the lake is short-lived. About time!

DamCam Back!

This view of the dam looking northwest shows where the water ends and the ice begins, Tuesday, April 2

After an extended period during which no image was available, the DamCam is up and running again.  With spring hopefully on the way, this will be an interesting time of year to observe the changes on the lake.

The camera is focused so that it takes in a large area of the east end of the lake in order to provide more perspective.  In doing so, the lens is set at a wide-angle view, and this does cause some change in perceiving distances.

Thanks to everyone who inquired about the DamCam.  It’s good to know it’s something that viewers of the website enjoy!

Two New “My Clark Lake Stories”

Larry Ryan

Larry Ryan

Check out two new interesting My Clark Lake Stories.  Both were written by Larry Ryan, who now lives in Bel Air, California.  But like most people who have experienced Clark Lake for any length of time, the memories are indelible and stay with you forever.

In the first post, you’ll learn about his experience at St. Rita Chapel during the time that it stood not far from Kentucky Point.  In Larry’s second post, you’ll experience the 1950s with him–from the day his family purchased land from Floyd Avis and built a cottage not far from Pleasant View.

Both are under My Clark Lake Story.

Sailors–This One’s for You

CLYC BurgeeThe Clark Lake Yacht Club is hosting a 2014 fun race series that is open to the public.  There are four race dates for the coming summer:

Sunday, June 22
Sunday, July 20
Sunday, August 10
Saturday, August 30

To check out the details, please click here or go to the Clark Lake Yacht Club website.